Schwedens Sonderweg


Laura Agustín, thelocal.se

Big claims, little evidence: Sweden’s law against buying sex

Every Swede knows that the famed law against buying sex – sexköpslagen – is a hot potato. Few politicians have commented one way or another on the evaluation of the law announced on 2 July, and only one government official claimed it proves the law is a success. Given that the report has been strongly criticised as empty of evidence and methodology but full of ideology in its very remit, debate has been curiously muted, even for the time of year.

At another period in history the sex-purchase law might have been considered a minor piece of legislation on a lesser social problem. Few people die, are maimed for life or lose their homes and jobs because of prostitution here; other threats to national security and happiness might seem more pressing.

But one feminist faction promotes the ideology that prostitutes are always, by definition, victims of violence against women. As victims, they can’t be criminals, so their side of the money-sex exchange is not penalised, whereas those who buy are perpetrators of a serious crime. This ideology, a minority view in other countries, predominates among Swedish State Feminists who claim that the existence of commercial sex is a key impediment to achieving gender equality. Such a dogma is odd, given the very small number of people engaged in selling sex in a welfare state that does not exclude them from its services and benefits. It is not illegal to sell sex in Sweden, just to buy it.

The evaluation leaned heavily on small-scale data about street prostitution, because that was the easiest to find. No one doubts that most street sex workers went somewhere else after the law came into effect, and no one knows where they went. But evaluators bolstered their case by claiming that street prostitution had increased in Denmark, where there is no such law, using information from a Copenhagen NGO whose inflated data was exposed in parliament last year. Street prostitution is known, in any case, to constitute a tiny, diminishing part of the whole of commercial sex.

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Stimmen aus dem Forum zum nämlichen Thema Big increase in prostitution reports :

Morons wasting taxpayer money in the name of the good ol‘ Christian ideals.

As always, with this law Sweden is pushing its sh*t to their neighbours and then claim that they are the cleanest country in the world.

While prostitutes cannot work in Sweden, the customes go massively to other countries (Poland, Estonia, Latvia, Thailand) where women’s righs basically don’t exist.

Instead of legalizing and give rights to people that work in something that will always exist (here or in the nearest border), they just deny it and move the problem elsewhere so that they can brag at how advanced their society is. Hipocrites.