US Scientists Just Confirmed They’ve Genetically Modified Human Embryos

Image: Ben Edwards/Getty Images
The researchers want to move onto clinical trials in humans and “monitor the birth of children.“

By Kate Lunau | MOTHERBOARD

On Wednesday, scientists confirmed widely circulating reports that they’d genetically modified human embryos in a US lab—and said that, after more research and ethical debate, they hope to begin clinical trials. That would mean „transplanting some of these embryos with the goal of establishing pregnancy and monitoring the birth of children,“ lead author Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University told reporters.

A clinical trial like this wouldn’t be possible right now in the US, where there are rules in place restricting embryo editing. But that doesn’t mean it couldn’t be done elsewhere. If the US won’t allow trials to proceed, „we would be supportive of moving this technology to different countries,“ said Mitalipov.

Although Mitalipov was careful to talk about this work in terms of genetic „correction,“ not „enhancement,“ we are on the road towards a time where it’ll be possible to make genetically engineered humans, giving us the ability to stamp out specific inheritable diseases and wield incredible power over our genome. Ethicists are concerned we are racing towards a future we aren’t prepared for, with risks we don’t understand.

read more

Advertisements

Älteste Fossilien der Erde entdeckt

In diesem Gestein des Nuvvuagittuq-Gürtels in Quebec entdeckten die Forscher die Lebensspuren © Dominic Papineau
In diesem Gestein des Nuvvuagittuq-Gürtels in Quebec entdeckten die Forscher die Lebensspuren © Dominic Papineau
Leben schon vor vier Milliarden Jahren? In einem der ältesten Gesteine der Erde haben Forscher mögliche Spuren des ersten Lebens entdeckt. Die Mikrofossilien bestehen aus winzigen Hämatit-Röhrchen und Filamenten, wie sie noch heute von Bakterien an hydrothermalen Schloten produziert werden. Sollte sich ihr biogener Ursprung bestätigen, wäre dies der älteste Nachweis für Leben auf unserem Planeten, wie die Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten.

scinexx

Klar ist: Irgendwann entstanden auf unserem Planeten die allerersten Zellen und damit das erste Leben. Doch wann dies geschah und in welcher Umgebung, ist bis heute ungeklärt. Einer der Gründe dafür: Es fehlt schlicht an eindeutigen Fossilien, weil die fragilen Zellen nicht erhalten geblieben sind. Forscher sind daher auf indirekte Hinweise angewiesen, darunter Minerale und chemische Verbindungen, die typischerweise erst durch die Tätigkeit von lebenden Zellen entstehen.

weiterlesen

„Quarz“ im Erdkern?

Statt Legierungen mit dem flüssigen Eisen zu bilden, könnten Silizium und Sauerstoff im äußeren Erdkern miteinander reagieren © Kelvinsong/ CC-by-sa 3.0
Statt Legierungen mit dem flüssigen Eisen zu bilden, könnten Silizium und Sauerstoff im äußeren Erdkern miteinander reagieren © Kelvinsong/ CC-by-sa 3.0
Überraschung im Erdkern: Die leichteren Elemente im äußerern Erdkern verhalten sich möglicherweise ganz anders als erwartet. Statt Eisenlegierungen zu bilden, könnten Silizium und Sauerstoff miteinander reagieren und zu Siliziumdioxid auskristallisieren – der Verbindung, aus der Quarzsand besteht. Sollte sich dieses Ergebnis von Hochdruck-Experimenten bestätigen, könnte diese Kristallisation sogar eine Triebkraft für den Geodynamo sein, wie Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten.

scinexx

Der Erdkern bildet die Basis für das schützende Magnetfeld der Erde und damit letztlich für das irdische Leben. Denn ohne die Wechselwirkung des inneren, festen mit dem äußeren flüssigen Kern gäbe es das Erdmagnetfeld nicht. Doch wann genau der innere Erdkern erstarrte und woraus er neben Eisen noch besteht, ist bisher umstritten beziehungsweise schlicht unbekannt.

weiterlesen

A Supernova Was Imaged Just Three Hours After Detonation

Graphic breaking down the information collected by the survey. Image: Ofer Yaron
Graphic breaking down the information collected by the survey. Image: Ofer Yaron
“Those are the earliest spectra ever taken of a supernova explosion.”

By Becky Ferreira | MOTHERBOARD

Scientists have snagged the earliest observations of a supernova ever captured, taken only three hours after a dying star began its fatally explosive finale. The research, published Monday in Nature Physics, opens a new window into the leadup and immediate fallout of stellar self-detonation, information that is normally blown into oblivion before astronomers have a chance to study it.

„There’s a limited time window,“ said study author Ofer Yaron, an astrophysicist based at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, in a Skype interview with Motherboard. Within days, he said, supernova ejecta traveling at the incredible velocity of 10,000 kilometers per second engulf the regions surrounding exploding stars, destroying evidence of the initial collapse.

But this particular supernova, called SN 2013fs, was spotted early on October 6, 2013 by the California-based Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). This wide-field sky survey operates in real time to detect flashy transient phenomenon and trigger follow-up observations over a network of facilities around the world.

Located in the galaxy NGC 7610, about 160 million light years from the Milky Way, SN 2013fs was flagged by iPTF swiftly enough for scientists to glimpse the dense disk of circumstellar material kicked off by the star during its death rattles. (Scientists observed light from the young supernova arriving at Earth; the event itself occurred over 100 million years ago.)

read more

Unser ältester Ururahn war ein Winzling

So könnte der Ur-Deuterostome Saccorhytus coronarius zu Lebzeiten ausgesehen haben. © S Conway Morris / Jian Han
So könnte der Ur-Deuterostome Saccorhytus coronarius zu Lebzeiten ausgesehen haben. © S Conway Morris / Jian Han
Urahn einer gewaltigen Sippe: In China haben Paläontologen den möglicherweise ältesten Vorfahren aller Deuterostomen entdeckt, der großen Tiergruppe, zu der alle Wirbeltiere, Manteltiere und Stachelhäuter gehören. Das winzige Wesen besitzt einen sackartigen Körper und einen auffallend großen, dehnbaren Mund, aber keinen Anus. Es lebte wahrscheinlich zwischen Sandkörnern am Meeresgrund, wie die Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten.

scinexx

Ob Wirbeltiere, Seeigel oder Manteltiere: So unterschiedlich diese Tiergruppen auch sind, sie alle gehören zu den Deuterostoma – dem Überstamm im Tierreich, der letztlich auch uns Menschen hervorbrachte. Allen Deuterostomen ist gemeinsam, dass ihr Rückenmark an der Körperrückseite liegt und dass ihr Mund sich im Embryo aus einer anderen Zellregion bildet als beispielsweise bei den Arthropoden.

weiterlesen

Trump’s Mexican Border Wall Would Be an Ecological Disaster

US-Mexico Border Wall in San Diego. Image: Bruno Sanchez-Andrade/Flickr
US-Mexico Border Wall in San Diego. Image: Bruno Sanchez-Andrade/Flickr
President Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday pushing ahead one of his signature campaign stumps—the construction of a massive $14-20 billion wall along the 2,000-mile-long border with Mexico, designed to deter illegal immigrants and drugs from entering the United States.

By Grennan Millikan | MOTHERBOARD

The wall has faced fierce criticisms from human rights groups for the possible humanitarian disaster it could cause (ask Berlin about this). But if built, the wall could pose another threat altogether: ecological disaster.

A barrier would sever animal populations living in the fragile desert ecosystems of the US-Mexico border from food resources, mates, and important migration routes. Such a disruption would deal an irreparable blow to countless species, including extraordinarily rare ones like the Sonoran jaguar and Mexican gray wolf.

Man-made barriers like roads and fences are some of the most devastating types of development to wildlife.

According to a US Fish and Wildlife Service provisional report released last year, a Trump wall covering the entire 2,000-mile border, with approximately 1,000 feet of developed space on either side,would potentially impact 111 endangered species, 108 species of migratory birds, four wildlife refuges and fish hatcheries, and an unknown number of protected wetlands.

read more

Six New Species Discovered Near Thermal Vents on Ocean Floor

"White
Image: wikimedia.org/PD/NOAA“  White flocculent mats in and around the extremely gassy, high-temperature (>100°C, 212°F) white smokers at Champagne Vent.
In 2011, a team of marine ecologists led by Jon Copley sent a remotely operated submarine nearly two miles underwater to observe a field of hydrothermal vents in the southwest Indian Ocean. Copley and his team collected 21 animal specimens from the vents using the underwater vehicle and after years of taxonomical research were able to determine that six of these species had not yet been formally described.

By Daniel Oberhaus | MOTHERBOARD

As detailed in a paper published this week in Nature, the six new species include a hairy chested Hoff crab, two types of snails, one type of mollusk and two different species of worm.

read more

Krebs: Auslöser für Metastasen entdeckt?

Zellen eines metastasierenden Melanoms © Julio C. Valencia/ NCI/NIH
Zellen eines metastasierenden Melanoms © Julio C. Valencia/ NCI/NIH
Waffe gegen wandernde Krebszellen? Krebstumore benötigen offenbar bestimmte Fette, um Metastasen zu bilden. Denn einige ihrer Zellen tragen spezielle Fettsäure-Rezeptoren, mit deren Hilfe sie an Energie gelangen. Erhalten krebskranke Mäuse eine besonders fettreiche Kost, verstärkt dies ihre Metastasenbildung. Blockiert man dagegen diese Andockstellen, geht die Metastasierung deutlich zurück, wie Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten. Diese Erkenntnis könnte nun neue Ansätze für Therapien liefern.

scinexx

Für Krebspatienten ist meist die größte Angst, dass der Tumor bereits gestreut hat und Metastasen nun auch andere Organe befallen. Das passiert, wenn sich einzelne Krebszellen aus dem Zellverband lösen, über Blut- oder Lymphbahnen auf Wanderschaft gehen und dann in anderes Gewebe eindringen. Dort können sie sich ansiedeln, teilen und auf diese Weise Tochtergeschwulste des ursprünglichen Tumors bilden.

weiterlesen

This Camouflaging Spider Will Make You Forever Suspicious of Dead Leaves

No wonder this little guy went undiscovered for so long. Image: Matjaž Kuntner
No wonder this little guy went undiscovered for so long. Image: Matjaž Kuntner
Scientists have discovered a unique, leaf-shaped spider that perfectly camouflages itself in rainforest trees—and even drags dead leaves up into the branches, securing them with web, to help itself hide.

By Kaleigh Rogers | MOTHERBOARD

A short paper published in the Journal of Arachnology this week described the spider, which was discovered in 2011 by a group of researchers in the rainforests of Mengla, in Yunnan province, China. They were on an expedition to look for spiders, but not this specific kind, according to Matjaž Kuntner, lead author of the paper and a research with both the National Museum of Natural History and the Jovan Hadži Institute of Biology ZRC SAZU in Slovenia.

“We’re trained to find strands of spider silk at night by using our headlamps and we found these strands of silk and basically followed them to the source of it,” Kuntner explained.

The first spider was found hanging among dead leaves that were lashed to the tree branches with spider silk, making the researchers suspect that the female spider went down to the forest floor, gathered up dead leaves, dragged them to her hiding spot, and hung them up like curtains.

read more

Ist Pluto umgekippt?

Die Eisebene Sputnik PLanum in PLutos hellem
Die Eisebene Sputnik PLanum in PLutos hellem „Herz“ könnte einst viel weiter nordwestlich gelegenn haben. © NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
Verrutschter Zwergplanet: Pluto hatte früher vielleicht eine ganz andere Ausrichtung als heute. Denn er könnte im Laufe seiner Geschichte um bis zu 60 Grad gekippt sein. Erst so gelangte die herzförmige Eisebene des Zwergplaneten an ihre heutige Position. Szenarien für diese Polwanderung präsentieren zwei Forschergruppen im Fachmagazin „Nature“. Demnach sorgte entweder eine erhöhte Eislast oder aber der subglaziale Ozean für eine Unwucht, die den Zwergplaneten kippen ließ.

scinexx

Pluto steckt voller Überraschungen. Wie die Aufnahmen und Daten der New Horizons-Raumsonde enthüllten, besitzt der Zwergplanet eine erstaunlich dynamische Oberfläche: Es gibt fließende Gletscher, in der Eisebene Sputnik Planitia – dem hell gefärbten „Herz“ des Pluto – befördern Konvektionsströme ständig wärmere Eismassen an die Oberfläche und wahrscheinlich gibt es sogar aktive Eisvulkane.

weiterlesen

Sind Faustkeile doch kein reines Menschenwerk?

Kapuzineraffen in Brasilien produzieren beim Steineklopfen Steinabschläge, die prähistorischen Faustkeilen erstaunlich ähnlich sind. © M.Haslam
Kapuzineraffen in Brasilien produzieren beim Steineklopfen Steinabschläge, die prähistorischen Faustkeilen erstaunlich ähnlich sind. © M.Haslam
Von wegen typisch menschlich: Vermeintlich frühmenschliche Faustkeile sind vielleicht doch keine Zeugnisse unserer Vorfahren. Denn auch Kapuzineraffen in Brasilien produzieren täuschend echte Steinwerkzeuge, wie Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten. Die Affen schlagen Quarzitbrocken aufeinander und erzeugen so Steinabschläge, die archäologischen Artefakten verblüffend ähneln. Muss die Frühgeschichte nun umgeschrieben werden?

scinexx

Die Fähigkeit, Faustkeile und andere Steinwerkzeuge herzustellen, gilt als eine entscheidende Errungenschaft früher Menschenvorfahren. Lange galt der Homo habilis dabei als erster Werkzeugmacher der Menschheitsgeschichte. Doch 2015 entdeckten Forscher am Turkanasee in Kenia noch deutlich ältere Steinwerkzeuge – wenn sie denn von Vormenschen stammen.

weiterlesen

Gewalt: Biologisches Erbe oder Kultur?

Aggression unter Artgenossen gibt es bei Schimpansen und anderen Primaten häufiger als bei den meisten anderen Säugetieren. © USO/thinkstock
Aggression unter Artgenossen gibt es bei Schimpansen und anderen Primaten häufiger als bei den meisten anderen Säugetieren. © USO/thinkstock
Gewalttätiges Erbe: Sind Mord und Totschlag bei uns kulturell bedingt – oder doch ein biologisches Erbe? Eine „Rasterfahndung“ im Säugetierstammbaum liefert dazu nun neue Fakten. Demnach nimmt die innerartliche Aggression auf dem Weg zu den Primaten deutlich zu, gleichzeitig fördert eine soziale und territoriale Lebensweise die Gewalt, wie die Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten. Wir Menschen haben daher gleich in doppelter Hinsicht eine hohe Gewaltneigung geerbt.

scinexx

Mord und Totschlag gibt es schon seit den Anfängen der Menschheit: Schon unter Neandertalern gab es tödliche Fehden, Massaker und sogar Kannibalismus, aber auch der Homo sapiens metzelte Gegner nieder, wie 10.000 Jahre alte Skelettfunde belegen.

weiterlesen

Als die Erde fast verdampfte

Image Credit: NASA/Don Davis
Image Credit: NASA/Don Davis
Wie ein Schlag mit dem Vorschlaghammer in eine Wassermelone: Die Urzeit-Kollision der Erde mit einem Protoplaneten könnte heftiger verlaufen sein als angenommen. Kalium-Isotope im Mondgestein deuten darauf hin, dass vor 4,5 Milliarden Jahren ein Großteil des Erdgesteins und der komplette Impaktor verdampften. Erst durch Wiedererstarren dieser Wolke bildete sich der Erdmantel und weiter außen entstand der Mond, wie Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten.

scinexx

Der Erdmond entstand durch eine urzeitliche Katastrophe – die Kollision der Erde mit einem Protoplaneten. Die Trümmer dieser Kollision sammelten sich in einer Umlaufbahn um die Erde und bildeten nach einiger Zeit den Mond – soweit die gängige Theorie. Doch sie hat einen Haken: Mond und Erde sind in ihren Isotopen-Zusammensetzungen nahezu identisch, obwohl der Mond durch die Überreste des Protoplaneten anders sein müsste.

Planetenforscher suchen daher nach einem Kollisions-Szenario, das diese rätselhaften Übereinstimmungen erklären kann. Einige spekulieren, dass der Protoplanet eine Art Erdzwilling gewesen sein muss, andere versuchen, in der Art des Einschlags und der Bildung des Mondes eine Erklärung zu finden.

weiterlesen

Chernobyl Has Turned into an Unlikely Poster Child for Environmentalism

The Pripyat Ferris Wheel, viewed from the City Center Gymnasium. Image: Kadams1970/PD
The Pripyat Ferris Wheel, viewed from the City Center Gymnasium. Image: Kadams1970/PD
The name “Chernobyl” has become synonymous with the eerie, urban ruins left in the wake of devastating nuclear fallout.

By Becky Ferreira | MOTHERBOARD

But a new legacy has begun to blossom from the ashes of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ), the 1000-square-mile surrounding the remains of the ill-fated Ukrainian power plant and its neighboring city of Pripyat. Once the site of the worst nuclear disaster in history, Chernobyl is becoming an unlikely poster child for sustainable energy and environmental renewal.

The most recent example of the Chernobyl’s green revival is a new effort to develop a solar power plant within the CEZ. For the past few weeks, Ostap Semerak, Ukraine’s minister of ecology, has been pitching Chernobyl as a potential solar hotspot to both foreign and domestic investors.

“We propose for our partners and investors to look on this territory with a quite different understanding; not as a territory of catastrophe, but as a territory of future development,” Semerak said during a visit to the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) in London this week.

read more

Chameleon Spit Is a Wonder of Physics

Chameleons may be the source material for many a stuffed toy and a series of really pretty strange beer commercials, but, make no mistake, when it comes to predatory behavior, they’re complete assassins. The chameleon tongue is a wonder of evolutionary engineering, enabling these old world lizards to hunt opportunistically—waiting, waiting, and then, zap. The tongue is deployed in a blur of slime, retrieving prey from up to a third of the chameleon’s body weight and from distances of over twice its body length. As such, the chameleon can essentially hunt without moving.

By Michael Byrne | MOTHERBOARD

How chameleons actually accomplish this remains something of a mystery. The „ballistic projection“ of the tongue is only part (a fascinating part) of the story—the chameleon still has to reel its prey back in to be chomped upon. It does this thanks to an extremely sticky tongue, obviously, but how this stickiness is actually implemented is of great interest to biologists and physicists. Now, according to a paper published Monday in Nature Physics by Pascal Damman and colleagues at the Université de Mons in Belgium, we may have some answers. It’s all in the spit.

More specifically, it’s all in the viscosity of the spit, which is about 400 times that of human spit. Given the right conditions, it can even behave more like an elastic solid than a proper liquid, however sticky. This is key.

read more

Humans Weren’t the Only Cause of the Woolly Mammoth’s Extinction

 Woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) in a late Pleistocene landscape in northern Spain. (Information according to the caption of the same image in Alan Turner (2004) National Geographic Prehistoric Mammals, Washington, D.C.: National Geographic. Image: Wikimedia Commons
Woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) in a late Pleistocene landscape in northern Spain. (Information according to the caption of the same image in Alan Turner (2004) National Geographic Prehistoric Mammals, Washington, D.C.: National Geographic. Image: Wikimedia Commons
A long-held theory about why great beasts like the woolly mammoth or saber-toothed tiger went extinct is the overkill hypothesis, which argues that early human predation took out the giant mammals roaming the Earth during the Late Pleistocene period. But new research suggests the mammals‘ demise isn’t entirely on our distant ancestors’ shoulders after all.

By Steve Huff | MOTHERBOARD

Research from a multinational team of scientists studying the vanishing of large mammals (the study team focused on animals weighing 100 pounds or more) from South America indicates that an unfortunate collision between rapid climate warming and the expansion of humans drove the creatures out of existence.

The study, recently published in the journal Science Advances, used genetic data and carbon-dated bone samples to determine that a striking number of animals had died around the same time period, about 12,300 years ago. Humans had arrived around 3,000 years before the mass deaths and apparently lived for a time in a relatively balanced existence with the great animals.

It was only when a sudden and rapid warming period caused changes in plant growth and rainfall around the world that notable extinctions occurred. The research suggests these major climate shifts and hungry, predatory humans combined to spell the end.

read more

Mini-Meteoriten zeugen von der Ur-Atmosphäre

Der Sauerstoffgehalt der irdischen Ur-Atmosphäre gibt Forschern Rätsel auf © NASA/JPL
Überraschung in Sachen Ur-Atmosphäre: Funde von winzigen Meteoriten, die vor 2,7 Milliarden Jahren niedergegangen sind, haben erstaunliche Hinweise über die Merkmale der damaligen Erdatmosphäre geliefert. Oxidations-Spuren an den nur etwa haarbreit-großen Partikeln legen nahe, dass die obere Atmosphäre damals bereits ähnliche Sauerstoffkonzentrationen aufwies, wie heute. Nur die untere Schicht war vor 2,7 Milliarden Jahren noch sehr sauerstoffarm.

scinexx

Die Atmosphäre der Erde war nicht immer so sauerstoffreich wie heute. Wissenschaftler sind sich einig: Vor rund drei Milliarden Jahren enthielt die Lufthülle um unseren Planeten herum kaum Sauerstoff. Doch Forscher um Andrew Tomkins von der Monash University in Melbourne haben nun Hinweise darauf entdeckt, dass diese Annahme so nicht stimmt – zumindest nicht für alle Schichten der urzeitlichen Atmosphäre.

weiterlesen

Erste „Wortkarte“ unseres Gehirns

Ein neuer Hirnatlas zeigt erstmals, wo unser Gehirn welche Wörter verarbeitet. Für mehr als 10.000 Wortbedeutungen kann man direkt erkennen, welche Areale aktiv werden. Demnach aktivieren Wörter mit eher sozialer Bedeutung beispielsweise andere Hirnareale als Farbwörter, Ortsangaben oder Zahlen. Das gesamte semantische Netzwerk überzieht jedoch das gesamte Gehirn, wie die Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten.

scinexx

Dank moderner bildgebender Verfahren weiß man heute, dass Sprache in unserem Gehirn mehr Areale aktiviert als nur die beiden bekannten Sprachzentren der linken Hirnhälfte. Stattdessen ist ein ganzes Netzwerk daran beteiligt, die Bedeutung der Wörter zu entschlüsseln. Doch wie die Arbeit innerhalb dieses Netzwerks verteilt ist und wo welche Bedeutungen verarbeitet werden, blieb weitgehend unbekannt.

weiterlesen

Genschere korrigiert Alzheimer-Mutation

Punktmutation: Eine neue Variante von CRISPR/CAs9 kann nun direkt fehlerhafte DNA-Basen austauschen © thinkstock
Falscher Buchstabe im Erbgut: Die als Durchbruch gefeierte Genschere CRISPR/Cas9 kann nun auch Punktmutationen korrigieren – Fehler im Erbgut, bei denen nur eine Base ausgetauscht ist. Diese Mutationen sind die Wurzel vieler Erbkrankheiten und gelten als Risikofaktoren beispielsweise für Alzheimer. Forscher ist es nun gelungen, mit CRISPR/Cas9 erstmals einen solchen Genfehler im Alzheimer-Risikogen APOE4 zu korrigieren, wie sie im Fachmagazin „Nature“ berichten.

scinexx

Die Genschere CRISPR/Cas9 gilt als Meilenstein der Genforschung, denn mit ihr besitzen Forscher ein Werkzeug, mit dem sie schnell, einfach und günstig das Erbgut editieren können – und das noch dazu relativ treffsicher. Bereits jetzt wurden Mäuse mit Hilfe von CRIPR/Cas9 von einem erblichen Muskelschwund geheilt,Schweine bekamen eine Virenresistenz und in China haben Forscher schon zweimal den höchst umstrittenen Eingriff in das Erbgut eines menschlichen Embryos gewagt.

weiterlesen

Neuro-Bypass gibt Gelähmten Bewegung zurück

Ian Burkhart war vier Jahre lang vom Hals abwärts gelähmt, jetzt kann er danke Neuro-Bypass seine rechte Hand wieder bewegen. © Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Batelle
Rückenmark überbrückt: Nach vier Jahren der vollständigen Lähmung kann Ian Burkhart nun seine rechte Hand wieder bewegen. Ermöglicht wird dies durch einen Neuro-Bypass: In sein Gehirn implantierte Elektroden lesen Bewegungsbefehle aus und senden sie über eine Elektrodenmanschette an seine Armmuskeln. Dies sei das erste Mal, dass ein Gelähmter auf diese Weise Kontrolle über seine eigenen Muskeln zurückbekommt, sagen die Forscher im Fachmagazin „Nature“.

scinexx

Der 24-jährige Ian Burkhart ist ein klassischer Quadriplegiker: Mit 20 Jahren erlebte er einen Autounfall, der sein Rückenmark zwischen dem fünften und sechsten Halswirbel durchtrennte. Als Folge war er seither vom Hals abwärts gelähmt und damit auf ständige Hilfe angewiesen. Zwar gelang es Forschern im letzten Jahr, Gelähmten durch eine Nervenverpflanzung wieder die Kontrolle der Arme zurückzugeben, doch dies funktioniert nur bei weiter unten liegenden Verletzungen des Rückenmarks.

weiterlesen